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Saturday, August 8, 2020 | History

2 edition of Repeated sequences in the pea genome. found in the catalog.

Repeated sequences in the pea genome.

David Lee

Repeated sequences in the pea genome.

by David Lee

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  • 11 Currently reading

Published by University of East Anglia in Norwich .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (Ph.D), University of East Anglia, School of Biological Sciences, 1990.

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19457171M

  Pea!!!!!!52 %! Maize!!!!!60 %! Saccharomycetes cerevisiae!5 %! E. coli!!!!! %! Hybridization! • Because DNA sequences will seek out and hybridize with other sequences with which they base pair in a specific way much information can be gained about unknown DNA using single stranded DNA of known sequence!! A set of pea DNA sequences representing the most abundant genomic repeats was obtained by combining several approaches. Dispersed repeats were isolated by screening a .

sequence syntax alone Area between genes • The human genome contains 3 billion base pairs ( Mb) but only 35 thousand genes • The coding region is 90 Mb (only 3% of the genome) • Over 50% of the genome is repeated sequences – Long interspersed nuclear elements – Short interspersed nuclear elements – Long terminal repeats. Three of the seven cloned repeated nucleotide sequences differentiated the genome of T. m. ssp. aegilopoides from that of T. urartu in repeated sequence abundance, restriction fragment length polymorphism, or both. The same distinctions were observed between the A genome of T. m. ssp. aegilopoides and the A genomes of polyploid wheats.

The 32 nt sequence we detected alongside pseudo-cox2 sequence is a further example of the small sequences commonly involved in the frequent rearrangements which occur in the mitochondrial genome of plants. The conservation of the this sequence in some plant species may point to it having a useful function, its association with various genes in. The creation of genomic libraries and complementary DNA (cDNA) libraries (collections of cloned sequences or all DNA from a genome) has sped up the process of physical mapping. A genetic site used to generate a physical map with sequencing technology (a sequence-tagged site, or STS) is a unique sequence in the genome with a known exact.


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Repeated sequences in the pea genome by David Lee Download PDF EPUB FB2

The reference genome sequence of pea. With its large and complex genome (ca Gb), pea represented a real challenge to genome sequencing. Inthe Pea Genome International Consortium launched a program dedicated to the development of a quality reference draft sequence for pea.

The pea genome v.1a assembly spans Gb (Table 1) representing ~88% of the estimated pea genome size (~ Gb), with % ( Gb) of sequences assigned to the seven pseudomolecules and Cited by: Renaturation of pea (Pisum sativum) DNA has been used to estimate the size of the pea genome and the fraction of pea DNA containing repeated DNA sequences.

Pea DNA renaturation and single copy tracer renaturation indicate that the size of the pea genome is picograms. More than 70% of pea DNA sequences are repeated from to 5, by: 8. Pea Genome Sequencing An International Consortium for Pea Genome Sequencing (PGS) has been formed to explore options for sequencing the pea genome.

If you are interested in participating in the consortium or learing more about the consortiums efforts please join the PGS mailing list. Repeated sequences in the pea genome. By D Lee. Abstract. SIGLEAvailable from British Library Document Supply Centre- DSC:DX / BLDSC - British Author: D Lee.

Renaturation of pea (Pisum sativum) DNA has been used to estimate the size of the pea genome and the fraction of pea DNA containing repeated DNA sequences. Pea DNA renaturation and single copy tracer renaturation indicate that the size of the pea genome is picograms.

More than 70% of pea DNA sequences are repeated from to 5, times. Essentially all of the sequences in the pea (Pisum sativum) genome which reassociate with single copy kinetics at standard (Tm °C) criterion follow repetitive kinetics at lower temperatures (about Tm°C).

Analysis of thermal stability profiles for presumptive single copy duplexes show that they contain substantial mismatch even when formed at standard criterion. In addition to highly repeated sequences it was also possible to at least partially reconstruct less abundant repeats, many of which were novel to the pea genome.

For example, an over 7 kb region of a MuDR-like DNA transposon, including 2 putative coding regions, could be reconstructed from 25 overlapping contigs. In order to answer these questions, we have investigated the gene distribution in the genomes of tomato ( Mb) and pea ( Mb), in which repeated sequences represent about 20%, and 70%, of the genome, respectively, as well as in the small genome ( Mb; B.

Benslimane, personal communication) of a non-graminaceous monocot, date palm. Next generation sequencing provides a powerful tool to study genome structure in species whose genomes are far from being completely sequenced. In this work we describe and compare different computational approaches to evaluate the repetitive component of the genome of sunflower, by using medium/low coverage Illumina or libraries.

By varying sequencing technology (Illumina or The pattern of sequence organization in the regions of the pea genome near sequences coding for mRNA differs significantly from that in total DNA. Interspersion of repeated and single copy sequences is so extensive that 85% of nucleotide-long fragments contain highly repetitive sequences (about copies per haploid genome).

Deoxyribonucleic acid sequence organization in the genome of the dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii. Ancient repeated sequences in the pea and mung bean genomes and implications for genome evolution. Books and Reference; Advertising. Repeated sequences (also known as repetitive elements, repeating units or repeats) are patterns of nucleic acids (DNA or RNA) that occur in multiple copies throughout the tive DNA was first detected because of its rapid re-association kinetics.

In many organisms, a significant fraction of the genomic DNA is highly repetitive, with over two-thirds of the sequence consisting of.

the investigation of whole genome sequence polymorphisms in pea and pave the way to genome wide association studies (GWAS) [,] as well as genomic selection []. Science 09 Aug Vol.

Issuepp. DOI: /science Author: Lee D. Search worldwide, life-sciences literature Search. Advanced Search. E.g. "breast cancer" HER2 Smith J. We present a draft assembly of the genome of European pear (Pyrus communis) ‘Bartlett’.

Our assembly was developed employing second generation sequencing technology (Roche ), from single-end, 2 kb, and 7 kb insert paired-end reads using Newbler (version ). It containsscaffolds greater than bases (maximum scaffold length of Mb) and covers a total of. Repeated sequences in the pea genome.

Author: Lee, David. ISNI: Awarding Body: University of East Anglia Current Institution: University of East Anglia Date of Award: Availability of Full Text: Full text unavailable from EThOS. Evolutionary sequence divergence within repeated DNA families of higher plant genomes.

Journal of Molecular Evolution17 (2), DOI: /BF Michael G. Murray, Debra L. Peters, William F. Thompson. Ancient repeated sequences in the pea and mung bean genomes and implications for genome evolution.

The presence and distribution of the most important highly repetitive DNA sequences of rye in cultivated and wild species of the genus Secale were investigated using fluorescence in situ hybridization.

Accurate identification of individual chromosomes in the most commonly recognized species or subspecies of the genus Secale (e, rale, S. In biology, a gene is a sequence of nucleotides in DNA or RNA that encodes the synthesis of a gene product, either RNA or protein.

During gene expression, the DNA is first copied into RNA can be directly functional or be the intermediate template for a protein that performs a function. The transmission of genes to an organism's offspring is the basis of the inheritance of phenotypic.This corresponds to a nucleotide long sequence repeated more thantimes.

The Alu family appears to be interspersed throughout 30 to 60% of the human genome. The Alu family does not appear to be related to the tandemly repeated sequences which have been isolated from human DNA by restriction enzyme cleavage.SUMMARY Short-sequence DNA repeat (SSR) loci can be identified in all eukaryotic and many prokaryotic genomes.

These loci harbor short or long stretches of repeated nucleotide sequence motifs. DNA sequence motifs in a single locus can be identical and/or heterogeneous.

SSRs are encountered in many different branches of the prokaryote kingdom.